Project: Stem Cell Therapy in Patients with Myocardial Infarction


Project: Stem Cell Therapy in Patients with Myocardial Infarction

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Team: Events, Training & News
Posted on September 28, 2018

CHIMb.ca
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Project: Stem Cell Therapy in Patients with Myocardial Infarction

Team: Events, Training & News

Date: This is not a timed event.

Description


Background

Sudden heart attacks are a major cause of death worldwide. The heart does not heal itself naturally, and many treatment methods, including bone marrow stem cell therapy, are being explored to minimize damage to the heart and to prevent deaths after a heart attack.

Goal

CHI’s Knowledge Synthesis platform set out to evaluate the impact of bone marrow stem cells treatment in patients with recent heart attack compared to standard treatment. Studies like these are important in reducing research waste by identifying which clinical trials have promise, and which present dead ends likely to result in wasted research investments. 

Results

After reviewing and analyzing evidence on the association of stem cell therapy in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (the most common heart attack), we concluded that there was no evidence to support the notion that current stem cell techniques have any long-term benefits on patients who have had a common procedure to open blocked coronary arteries. This information was disseminated to cardiologists at both an international conference (International Society for Heart Research), and through journal publications in the Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology and the Canadian Journal of Cardiology. 

Additionally, although bone marrow stem cells were still not part of the main treatment strategy for patients with heart attack, some studies based on preliminary findings were looking into integrating a stem cell centre next to cardiac surgery units to facilitate stem cell treatments right after heart attack. However, our study provided conclusive evidence that bone marrow stem cells are not beneficial in preventing death after heart attack compared to standard treatment.