Announcement: Spring 2019 PREPPP Award Winners Announcement


Announcement: Spring 2019 PREPPP Award Winners Announcement

[img]

Team: Events, Training & News
Posted on September 23, 2019

Back to News

CHIMb.ca
[img]

Announcement: Spring 2019 PREPPP Award Winners Announcement

Team: Events, Training & News

Date: This is not a timed event.

Description


Congratulations to the recipients of the Preparing for Research by Engaging Patient and Public Partners (PREPPP) Award, Spring 2019!

The PREPPP award supports researchers, students, and community organizations in engaging with patients and members of the public as partners in the priority-setting, design, and grant development phase of a health research project.

Three awarded teams submitted applications that demonstrated a commitment to the principles of patient-oriented research and the conduct of meaningful, safe, and inclusive engagement with patient and public partners in the planning of their research.

We would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone who applied for the Spring 2019 PREPPP Awards, and the Manitoba Primary and Integrated Healthcare Innovation (PIHCI) Network (MPN), who sponsored an entire award related to primary and integrated care. 

We are now accepting applications for Fall 2019! Applications due November 8.

 

Spring 2019 PREPPP Award Winners:  

Dr. Jennifer Protudjer, Dr. Leslie Roos, and Nancy Ross
Partnering with Adolescents to Inform a Nation-wide Food Allergy and Mental Health Program

Dr. Protudjer is an Epidemiologist at the George and Fay Yee Centre for Healthcare Innovation (CHI), Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics and Child Health at the University of Manitoba, and Scientist at the Children’s Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba. Below is a summary of the planned engagement that was part of her team’s successful PREPPP Award application:

Adolescence is a stressful period as children learn to manage new situations and transition toward independence. For children with a chronic disease, this period can be even more stressful as they are also learning to self-manage their disease. Recently, there has been interest in the psychological impact of food allergy, but these studies generally focus on the disease itself, not the impact of daily stress on disease. We are proposing to create a patient engagement group of adolescents with food allergy, to identify if and how they experience food-related anxiety, to learn about what supports they feel would help them, and to provide guidance in the creation of an anxiety support program for adolescents with food allergy. Adolescents will be recruited through the Children’s Allergy and Asthma Education Centre (CAAEC) in Winnipeg, including via their social media sites. Our strategy will be first developed in Manitoba, then expanded across Canada.

Drs. Cara Brown, Rebecca Ganann, Alan Katz, Dana Turcotte, Pamela Wener
Extending the Safety Net: How Can Interprofessional Primary Care Teams Facilitate Successful Hospital Discharges?

Dr. Brown is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Occupational Therapy at the University of Manitoba and Centre on Aging Research Affiliate. Below is a summary of the planned engagement that was part of her team’s successful PREPPP Award application, which has been generously sponsored by the Manitoba Primary and Integrated Healthcare Innovation (PIHCI) Network (MPN):

The discharge process from hospital to home is problematic for many older adults. As hospital stays continue to get shorter, older adults feel poorly equipped to manage their complex care needs with their limited social supports when they return home. Even though a large body of research has focused on how hospitals can better support transitions, older adults continue to be at risk for poor outcomes like hospital readmission.

Manitoba has started incorporating community-based transitional care teams and health professional networks into primary care. These teams provide access to community-based social, health, and rehabilitation services that were not previously available. These teams have potential to address common post-discharge issues like medication errors, reduced function, and caregiver burnout. However, this is an unexplored research area. We aim to propel practice change in how interprofessional community and primary care teams support transitions from hospital to home by engaging patients, care providers, and policymakers in creating a vision for optimal care.

Drs. Lily Lim, Kristen Gerhold, Umut Oguzoglu
Informing Outcomes of Adults with Childhood-Onset Chronic Rheumatic Diseases—A Partnership in Research with Patients and their Families

Dr. Lim is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Manitoba, and Staff Pediatric Rheumatologist at the Children’s Hospital of Manitoba. Below is a summary of the planned engagement that was part of her team’s successful PREPPP Award application:

Childhood arthritis and systemic autoimmune diseases, like lupus, make up the two largest groups of diseases within childhood-onset chronic rheumatic diseases (ChildCRD). ChildCRD can result in lifelong physical limitations and ill-health. We do not know what will happen to ChildCRD children when they become adults. This is important for educating patients/families and their doctors about what to expect, and how best to manage ChildCRD adults. We want to do this research in partnership with our patients/families, so that the work we do is also meaningful to them. We will do this by forming advisory committees to help choose the most important research questions to study, to find easier ways to help patients join our research, and to help us understand the meaning of our results from the patients’ viewpoints, so as to appropriately use the results to improve their lives.