Series: Why it is Important to Incorporate a Trauma-Informed Intersectional Analysis in Patient Enga...


Series: Why it is Important to Incorporate a Trauma-Informed Intersectional Analysis in Patient Engagement in Health Research

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January 10, 2018, 12:00 to: 13:00
Chown Building - Room 474 753 McDermot Ave. 4th floor, Room 474 Winnipeg Manitoba R3E 0T6
Team: Events, Training & News

CHIMb.ca
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Series: Why it is Important to Incorporate a Trauma-Informed Intersectional Analysis in Patient Engagement in Health Research

Team: Events, Training & News

Location: Chown Building - Room 474 753 McDermot Ave. 4th floor, Room 474 Winnipeg Manitoba R3E 0T6

January 10, 2018, 12:00 to: 13:00

Description


Patient & Public Engagement in Health Research Lunchtime Learning Series

The concept of patient engagement in health research has received growing international recognition over recent years. Yet despite some critical advancements, the concept remains problematic as it negates the very real complexities and context of people’s lives. Patient engagement approaches that do not consider the simultaneous interactions between different social categories (e.g. race, ethnicity, Indigeneity, gender, class, sexuality, geography, age, ability, immigration status, religion) that make up social identity, as well as the impact of systems and processes of oppression and domination (e.g. racism, colonialism, classism, sexism, ableism, homophobia) exclude the involvement of individuals who often carry the greatest burden of illness ― the very voices traditionally less heard in health research.  In order to be a more inclusive and meaningful approach that does not simply reiterate existing health inequities, it is important to reconceptualize patient engagement through a health equity and social justice lens by incorporating a trauma-informed intersectional analysis. This talk will provide:

  • Key concepts to the incorporation of a trauma-informed intersectional analysis in patient engagement in health research; and
  • Important questions to consider when developing a patient engagement strategy in health research training, practice and evaluation.

Biosketch:

Carolyn Shimmin is the Patient and Public Engagement Lead at the George and Fay Yee Centre for Healthcare Innovation (CHI).  In this role, she helps lead CHI’s strategy on public involvement in health research. Previous experience includes stakeholder engagement, research, writing and reporting on various health policy issues including mental health, addictions, trauma and the sexual exploitation of youth. Areas of interest include patient engagement, knowledge translation, trauma-informed approaches, intersectional analysis, and poststructuralist queer theory. Carolyn has a Bachelor of Journalism Combined Honours Political Science and a Master of Gender Studies.

 Please see the presenters PowerPoint presentation linked below.

 

Documents and Photos

Map

Location: 753 McDermot Ave. 4th floor, Room 474, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada